On a Visit

When I picture an urban fantasy heroine I see tight fitting clothing, long, flowing hair, and lots of sharp pointy weapons. I see a woman who can run in high heels and throw a punch, the kind who would rather fight a monster than hide from one. Essentially, I see a woman who is the exact opposite of me. Because I am afraid of monsters. I can barely walk in heels, let alone run, and I do not own a weapon – sharp, pointy, or otherwise. I’m visiting Lisa over at Paranormal & Urban Fantasy Reviews today to talk about urban fantasy heroines. Stop by and say hello, leave a comment, and enter to win a free copy of Tab Bennett and the Inbetween.

On a Visit

Today I’m over at twimom227’s blog talking with her about a number of things. For example, here’s a quote from the post: “In my early twenties, I was involved in one that ended with me crying, drunk, and hugging a parking meter on a dark street in London at 2 o’clock in the morning while the other girl involved tried to convince me that I deserved Kevin more than she did. As an aside, it turned out Kevin didn’t deserve either one of us.”

Want to know what the heck I’m talking about? Come see at http://bit.ly/P2LOzk

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Mary is Dead: A Drabble

“There’s no reason to panic,” Mary assured herself, knowing all the while no one ever says that unless there is, in fact, a very good reason to panic. She had several:

•  She was inexplicably dressed like an Easter egg.
•  She was in a cemetery and dead things creeped her out.

•  She was a dead thing.

At least her body was dead. She knew that for sure because she’d left it laying still and quiet and calmly turning into nothing in the soft gray coffin in which she’d been laid to rest.

The rest of her, it seemed, had other ideas.

In case you were wondering, A drabble is an extremely short work of fiction of exactly one hundred words in length, not necessarily including the title.The purpose of the drabble is brevity, testing the author’s ability to express interesting and meaningful ideas in an extremely confined space. Wanna Play? Feel free to leave your own drabble in the comments.

This picture was taken by Bill Wadman and is used here with his permission.
(Thanks, Billy) To see more of his drabbles series, please visit http://www.billwadman.com/drabbles/

Sonya ♥s Leonard: A Drabble

Sonya had bad taste in men. She couldn’t help it. Something about bad boys intrigued her. She knew the distance they kept was a defense mechanism, the anger in their eyes a mask to hide the pain. She wanted to save them – from themselves, from women who didn’t understand them, from the world that had been so careless with their delicate hearts. Her friends didn’t understand the attraction. Couldn’t see in any of them the things that were so obvious to Sonya. They’d hated poor Harry. Been awful to Luke.
Photo by Bill Wadman
Still, she had to admit they were right about Leonard.

In case you were wondering, A drabble is an extremely short work of fiction of exactly one hundred words in length, not necessarily including the title.The purpose of the drabble is brevity, testing the author’s ability to express interesting and meaningful ideas in an extremely confined space. Wanna Play? Feel free to leave your own drabble in the comments.

This picture was taken by Bill Wadman and is used here with his permission.
(Thanks, Billy) To see more of his drabbles series, please visit http://www.billwadman.com/drabbles/

 

 

Vocation, Obligation, & the Fiction Writer

The word should stresses me out. My eye is twitching a little right now just thinking about it. It’s a word that “reeks of guilt, regret, powerlessness. If you should do something, it probably means you don’t want to do it, but you’ll do it anyway, albeit begrudgingly. “ I have a long, long, LONG list of things I should do and it seems to get longer every day. Maybe it’s because I have a full time job, a house, two kids, and a dog. Maybe it’s because I’m trying to write a book, manage my mini media empire, and occasionally clock more than 4 hours of sleep. Maybe it’s because I suck at time management. The point is, sometimes I feel like I am awash in a sea of should and I can’t swim and my inner tube has sprung a slow leak.

Not that there’s anything special about any of that. In fact, I’ll bet if you think about it, you have a long should list and a twitchy eye and your own slowly deflating inner tube. Most of us do. It seems to be the curse of modern life.

It never really bothered me until I started hearing myself say things like “I should be writing” and “I should finish Chapter 13 today.” How did that happen? How did writing go from being something I love to do, to something I have to do? Something on the same list with cleaning the bathtub and washing the dog (though not in that order, obviously)? How did I let the line get so blurred and more importantly, how can I sharpen it up again?

First off I’m trying not to say should so much anymore. Under this new rule I will no longer be saying things like, “I should put this book down and do the dishes” or “I should get to work early today.” I’m still going to have a list of things I need to do, and I’ll still going to do those things because frankly, they’re not going to do themselves and they’re shitty jobs that no one else wants, but I’m going to try very hard to change the way I talk about doing them.

  • I’m going to stop being resentful and feeling guilty about the existence of the should list.
  • I’m going to let the little stuff go. Maybe I should organize the linen closet, but I’m not going to.
  • I’m going to make time for the things I want to do.

But most importantly, I’m going to remember the difference between an obligation and a vocation and stop saying “I should be writing.” I’m going to write because I like to. Not because I should.

What’s on your should list? Tell me all about it in the comments. Maybe we can help each other out.